He is the author of Siege Engines (Πολιορκητικά), dedicated to an unnamed emperor, likely Trajan. Newsletter Repro.1864-128. He was an architect, who worked for the Roman Emperor Trajan (98-117) and his successor Hadrian (117-138). Trajan’s Column London: V&A Publications, 2007, pp. For more complex objects, with a raised surface, the mould would have to be made from a number of sections, known as piece-moulds. Private Research A prolific engineer and architect who worked primarily for the Roman emperor Trajan, Apollodorus of Damascus is credited with having designed most of the imperial buildings constructed during his reign, including baths, a forum, a bridge over the Danube, and the famous Trajan’s Column (completed 113). These two substances formed a mould that had a slightly elastic quality, so that it could easily be removed from the original object. The casts were made from metal versions produced by craftsmen working under the direction of Emperor Napoleon III in 1862. The original was perhaps made by Apollodorus of Damascus in 106-113 AD in Rome, Italy. Once the object has been cast from this mother-mould, the piece-moulds can be easily removed one by one, to create a cast of the three-dimensional object. The column took seven years to complete and has stood in Rome ever since, surviving for nearly 2000 years. As an imperial architect, he designed many monuments and buildings. A metal copy, or electrotype, was made in pieces from this mould, and then sets of plaster cast copies were produced from the electrotype. The plasters can also be re-worked, so that their appearance differs slightly from the original from which they were taken. 312 Plaster cast of Trajan's Column which is displayed in two sections due to its height. Copy of Trajan's Column made in plaster about 1864 probably in Rome, Italy and purchased from M. Oudry in 1864 for £301 15s 2d. The continuous frieze in low relief depicting the history of Trajan's campaigns winds up and around the column for a total length of over 200 metres, depicting over 2500 individual figures. These are the galleries in which you are standing today. This is partly because the figurative forms and lettering can be seen more clearly here than those on the weathered original in Rome. Website / Blog It was made for the Roman Emperor Trajan who commissioned the original to commemorate his conquest of Dacia. The Roman Emperor Trajan commissioned the original monumental structure to commemorate his conquest of Dacia, now Romania. Apollodorus of Damascus and Trajan's column from tradition to project This edition published in 2003 by L'Erma di Bretschneider in Roma. Plaster cast of Trajan's Column made about 1864. -- The moulds are coated with a separating or paring agent to prevent the newly poured plaster sticking to them. It is possibly the most famous example of Roman square capitals, a script often used for monuments. Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points: Maximum 4000 copies, or 5 years digital use, No book jacket, or homepage lead image use, Images must be credited © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. An internal spiral staircase of 185 steps, lit by narrow windows, gives access to the platform above. Flatter, smaller objects in low relief usually require only one mould to cast the object. This vast simulacrum of the original column in Rome allowed students, scholars and innumerable other visitors to the Museum to admire this great relic of the classical world. Read our, Cast Courts, The Ruddock Family Cast Court, Room 46A, Copyright: © Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2017. The V&A's casts are of large-scale architectural and sculptural works as well as small scale, jewelled book covers and ivory plaques, these last known as fictile ivories. Perhaps the most famous of them is Trajan's Column in Rome. Painted plaster Separate plaster panels are to be found in other collections elsewhere. The column, which was built in the Roman Doric order and measures 125 feet, was the first triumphal monument of its kind. Hermes with infant Dionysos on his arm, ca. The sequence of plaster cast reliefs showing Emperor Trajan's Dacian campaigns are mounted on two gigantic brick columns. The Museum commissioned casts directly from makers and acquired others in exchange. These were once displayed at the Louvre, and now survive in parts at the Château of St Germain en Laye, just outside Paris. The Making of Sculpture: the Materials and Techniques of European Sculpture. A prolific engineer and architect who worked primarily for the Roman emperor Trajan, Apollodorus of Damascus is credited with having designed most of the imperial buildings constructed during his reign, including baths, a forum, a bridge over the Danube, and the famous Trajan’s Column (completed 113). A metal copy, or electrotype, was made in pieces from this mould, and then sets of plaster cast copies were produced from the electrotype. This statue was replaced in 1587 by the present bronze figure of St Peter, made by Bastiano Torrigiano (d.1596). It was designed and constructed probably under the supervision of the architect Apollodorus of Damascus, and stood at the focal point of Trajan’s Forum in the Imperial City. The cast of Trajan's Column at the V&A inspires awe and wonder amongst visitors to the Cast Courts, and is much studied by students of classical archaeology and art history. Napoleon III ordered a mould to be made of the column. Cormier, Brendan and Thom, Danielle, eds. Museum no. When first acquired by South Kensington in the 1860s the cast reliefs could not be accommodated on high columns, and were shown mounted on smaller structures in the Museum. 17, 35, 36, 114. Measuring 35 metres high, the column copy was too tall to be constructed at full height within the Museum building at the time. So in 1873, the Museum built the Architectural Courts to house its growing collection of monumental copies. Outside the capitol, Apollodorus built bridges across the Danube and the Tagus in Spain and designed the triumphal arches of Trajan at Benevento and Ancona. Trusted, Majorie. The initial mould could be made from one of several ways. Rome, Italy [21/06/2018] A flexible mould could be made by mixing wax with gutta-percha, a rubbery latex product taken from tropical trees. Sculpture; Archaeology; Architecture; Plaster Cast; Copies; Cast Courts. Oronzio Lelli, of Florence was a key overseas supplier while, in London, Giovanni Franchi and Domenico Brucciani upheld a strong Italian tradition as highly-skilled mould-makers, or formatori. Painted plaster cast. Probably Rome, Italy Apollodorus was banished from Rome by the emperor Hadrian, possibly due to a disagreement over a temple design, and executed around the year 130. The calligraphy has long been acclaimed, and is emulated even today, inspiring modern typefaces. Object history note. Personal use, Search 1,238,340 objects and 862,915 images, We use cookies to enhance your experience on V&A websites. Height: 523.5 cm, Diameter: 422.5 cm base. 590–580 B.C. ed. About 1864 Some casts are highly accurate depictions of original works, whilst others are more selective, replicating the outer surface of the original work, rather than its whole structure. The original was made perhaps by Apollodorus of Damascus in 106-113 AD. Low-relief carvings that decorate the marble column depict the emperor’s campaigns, and a chamber in the pedestal served as Trajan’s tomb. Another set of plaster copies is in Rome at the Museum of Roman Civilisation, and a third at the National Museum of Romanian History, Bucharest.
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